Traditional Style Awning

The 'traditional' blind, or victorian style awning as we know it today was the standard form of shop blind before the introduction of folding arms. It has been updated by the use of modern materials and is specified mainly for use on shops within conservation areas and other areas of special interest, although it can be fitted in any location.

Types and operation
Traditional blinds are usually supplied with arms and slides and occasionally with trellis extension arms. Pivot or 'shoe' arms are also available.

The blinds with arms and slides or trellis arms are supplied with a pull down pole for operation. Those supplied with pivot arms can be operated by gearbox or electric motor as well as by means of a pole.

The blinds are wound on helical spring rollers, or on geared or electric motorised rollers. The rollers are housed in specially constructed wooden blind boxes with wooden front laths of a raised panel or ogee profile.

Blind boxes were originally fixed above the name fascia or entablature, and this allowed for the blind cloth to be set at a steep angle which gave a pleasing aspect to the blind, better ventilation and better weathering.

The present tendency is for blind boxes to be fitted below the name fascia panel and consequently a much flatter blind is the result. This sometimes calls for the introduction of brass rainwater drain eyelets on the cover.

Wherever possible, consideration should be given to positioning the blind box at the highest level.

Fabric
Blind coverings are in the main made from woven acrylic fibre, with an incorporated dirt repellent. This material has the appearance of traditional cotton duck but is more robust. Reinforced PVC blind cloths are also available.

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